Broadcasting, Getting Started, Tips

Does Your Radio Station Sound Like the Pros?

When it comes to internet radio, listeners have plenty of choices. So, in a sea of radio stations, how do you make yours stand out? A major factor is sounding professional, and there are some steps that you can take to make sure your station is always sounding its best.


Current Programming

Okay sure, sometimes old news is relevant to something that’s current. But, don’t bring up old news like it’s new. Instead, phrase it in a way that listeners understand that it happened in the past, but this is the first time you've mentioned it on your station.

As for music, unless your format requires it, it's not crucial for your music to be current with what has been recently released. However, you do want to keep your library fresh with tracks that are new to your station.

If you have promos or commercials running on your station, make sure they’re still current too! Imagine how disappointed you’d be if you heard about an exciting upcoming event only to discover by the end of the spot that the event already happened!


Dead Air

No one is tuning in to your station to listen to nothing (aka dead air). Granted, it’ll happen on occasion, but try to avoid it at all costs. This is especially important if you are broadcasting live. Maybe you have an on-air guest and something inappropriate or awkward happens? Have a plan in place for those instances! Change the subject with the guest, play some music, or cut to commercial. Always be prepared! Also, you can always keep AutoDJ turned on so that should there ever be a disruption with your encoder, AutoDJ will take over.


The DJs

Your audience wants to hear an enthusiastic DJ. If you truly enjoy what you do, it won’t be hard to make your smile shine through the airwaves. An often enjoyable part of the job is interacting with your audience. Whether they call in, email, or tweet at your station, do your best to take their request or reply to them in a timely manner.


Radio Imaging

Radio imaging is the auditory elements that you can use to identify and individualize your station. When it comes to branding your station, you want it to not only appear professional, but sound professional as well. This is where radio imaging comes in. You may even want to contract some of this work out if you’re the main voice of the station. A professional sounding promo spot, with a different voice than yours, gives a bit more credibility to your station. For more info on radio imaging, check out this article.


The Gear

Your setup can really make a huge difference. Even a decent microphone can instantly upgrade your sound. Not sure what gear you might need? Check out our list of the 5 Must-Have Pieces of Radio Equipment for a Professional Studio Setup.


Microphone Etiquette

While your setup matters, your microphone etiquette can make or break your sound as well. If you're moving around a bunch, bumping the mic, in a noisy environment, or in a room with a lot of reverb, you're not going to end up with a very professional sound on your station.


Audio Editing & Processing

Audio editing and processing software, like Audacity and Adobe Audition, is a great tool for ensuring a consistent volume and sound quality throughout all of your programming. Since each original content piece may have a different volume, you can address that inconsistency with normalization and other features within audio editing software.


Automation Software

Don’t have time to program all of your content? No problem! There are some great automation software options available to you, including StationPlaylist, NextKast, and Mixxx. Live365's AutoDJ also helps you fill in any gaps in your station’s schedule with DMCA-compliant programming.


Discover thousands of free stations from every genre of music and talk at live365.com/listen. Keep up with the latest news by following us on Facebook (Live365 Official and Live365 Broadcasting) and Twitter (@Live365 and @Broadcaster365)!

Article Image: Pexels via Pixabay.

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About Sarah Osborne

  • Pennsylvania
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About Michelle Ruoff

  • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania